Harriton House

Harriton House

Harriton Road, Bryn Mawr

Harriton House was built by Welsh Quaker, Rowland Ellis and named Bryn Mawr meaning “high hill” after his ancestral farmstead in Wales; Property was part of a 700-acre land grant from to Ellis from William Penn in 1682; Ellis ran into financial problems and sold house in 1719 to Maryland tobacco farmer Richard Harrison, who renamed it “Harriton.” Its most famous owner was Charles Thompson, Secretary to the Continental Congress, who spent retirement years in late 18th at Harriton. Land to the south of Ellis’ tract was owned by the Humphrey family—land that now includes BMC & Baldwin and downtown BM

The house was purchased by Lower Merion Township in 1969.Today a restored Harriton House and surrounding 16 ½ acre park are open to the public as a museum owned by the township and administered by the not-for-profit Harriton Association.

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